So, last week, we went to Seoul. The reason of going was I had to apply for a visa in Singapore embassy for attending a conference. Well, the authority there said due to lack of time for visa processing there’s a good possibility that, I’m going to miss the conference. I was really heartbroken, because it keeps happening to me for the past few months. And so, to cheer me up, my husband decided that we take a short trip! Gosh, I keep falling in love with this man again and again! ❤

We were looking for opportunities for trying out hanbok or traditional Korean dress for a long time but we never had it. Our friends there, mentioned about this place, Gyeongbokgung Palace, mostly because of the museum there. Because I was telling earlier how I loved to see a museum. But then arriving there, when we saw so many people trying out hanbok, we couldn’t resist ourselves either. lol 😛

Built in 1395, Gyeongbokgung Palace is also commonly referred to as the Northern Palace because its location is furthest north when compared to the neighboring palaces of Changdeokgung (Eastern Palace) and Gyeonghuigung (Western Palace) Palace. Gyeongbokgung Palace is arguably the most beautiful, and remains the largest of all five palaces.

The premises were once destroyed by fire during the Imjin War (Japanese Invasions, 1592-1598). However, all of the palace buildings were later restored under the leadership of Heungseondaewongun during the reign of King Gojong (1852-1919).

Remarkably, the most representative edifices of the Joseon Dynasty, Gyeonghoeru Pavilion and Hyangwonjeong Pond have remained relatively intact. Woldae and the sculptures of Geunjeongjeon (The Royal Audience Chamber) represent past sculptures of contemporary art.

The National Palace Museum of Korea is located south of Heungnyemun Gate, and the National Folk Museum is located on the eastern side within Hyangwonjeong.

Reference: http://english.visitkorea.or.kr/enu/ATR/SI_EN_3_1_1_1.jsp?cid=264337

Near the palace, there are some shops that rents you a hanbok for 10,000-30,000 KRW, for up to 4 hours. When you go there you will see plenty of hanbok and you get to choose one, however you like. They will help you wear it. They will even provide you a makeover even if you want. Korean people usually wear this dress in their traditional occasions. Though it looks more like a gown, but it is much similar to tunic. At first you have to wear the tunic part and then the blouse over it. Well, I mean the female wear hanbok, I’m not sure about the male wear lol 😛

When you go there you will see plenty of foreigners, sometimes even Koreans renting a hanbok and roaming around wearing one. It’s actually quite fun, wearing and trying out a new dress. Specially when everyone around you is also trying out like you. People walking in the streets wearing a hanbok, everyone looking at them with curiosity, even they looking at each other with curiosity, sometimes even pedestrians complementing you, saying you look beautiful, well, that’s one lovely experience for sure.

And specially, when a hijabi girl like me, tries a dress like this! I think it was a good fusion, you know? Hanbok & hijab! 🙂 In some pictures there are two other ladies with me, I don’t know where they are from, but by their appearance, I guess, they are from China. We were crossing each other, and suddenly they asked for a picture with me! 😀

Anyways, enough talking, let’s see some pictures!

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There are also some other nice places around there, so make sure to keep times in your hand! I hope you liked the post! Have a nice day!

Munira Chowdhury, 02/03/2017

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